Geographies of diversity and ethnic mixing

geographies-of-diversity-coverThis release explores population change between censuses for ethnic minority groups in Bradford; describing the geographic distribution at ward level for each largest minority group. Segregation is considered using a dissimilarity index for ethnic minority group separation, including changes between censuses.

Summary findings

  • The non-white population in Bradford has grown by 68,500 persons over the past decade, which is an increase of two-thirds.
  • The ethnic minority population now represents one-third of the total population of Bradford.
  • The White British group remains the largest population accounting for more than 3 out of every 5 residents.
  • By far the largest ethnic minority group are Pakistani, accounting for around one-fifth of the population in Bradford.
  • The Bangladeshi population has almost doubled over the past decade, now with around 10,000 residents.
  • Black ethnic groups had the largest rate increase since 2001, however the Chinese population decreased by almost one-third.
  • Ethnic minority groups tend to be clustered around inner city Wards, and Keighley Central.
  • Residential mixing over the past decade had a general movement toward less separation for many ethnic minority groups.
  • The degree of this separation varies between groups, with Bangladeshi and Pakistani the most segregated and White Irish the least.

To open this statistical bulletin please click here.

Health inequality widest in older middle-aged

2011Census-logoNew analysis from the Office for National Statistics focuses on the extent of inequality in health and disability between more and less disadvantaged populations in England using Census 2011 and area deprivation data. 

The distribution of health and disabling health conditions across the population of England is shown to follow a sizeable, persistent and incremental pattern; health outcomes generally worsen in line with greater levels of socio-economic disadvantage.

Key points

  • Men and Women (aged 40 to 44) living in the most deprived areas are around four times more likely to have ‘Not Good’ health compared to their equivalent in the least deprived areas.
  • Inequalities in health remain large, even at older ages; in the least deprived areas people aged 80 to 84 reported better rates of health than those 20 years their junior in the most deprived areas.
  • The inequality in health between the most and least deprived areas peaks at ages 55 to 59 for women and 60 to 64 for men.
  • Future fitness to enjoy retirement is likely to be more favourable for the least deprived population than the most deprived; at ages 60 to 64 disabling health problems are much less common among the least deprived.
  • The disability prevalence divide between the most and least deprived areas is large across the working ages of 30 to 64, where adults are expected to participate in the labour market.
  • The fact that both men and women in the least deprived areas aged 65 to 69 have similar percentages disabled as those aged 40 to 44 in the most deprived areas suggests fitness to extend working careers post the traditional state pension age for men (65) is more likely among the least deprived area residents.

The full report can be opened here.

Households below a Minimum Income Standard: 2008/9 to 2011/12

JRF-logoCommissioned research show almost 1 million more households in the UK are living below the minimum income standard, taking the figure to 4.7 million households at 2011/12.

Key points

  • The most severe increase has been among single people of working age, where the percentage unable to afford this minimum acceptable standard of living rose from 29 per cent to 36 per cent.
  • Among single people aged under 35 it rose even faster, from 29 to 42 per cent. This group also had an even greater increase in risk of having extremely low incomes, of less than half the minimum required.
  • Two in three people in lone parent families are now below Minimum Income Standard.
  • Pensioners and couples without children remain the most likely to have an adequate income.

The full report can be opened here.

2013 Local Health Profiles

obs-logo-health-profileThe 2013 version of the local Health Profiles have been published this week and can be accessed at www.healthprofiles.info. They give a snapshot overview of health for each local authority in England.

These profiles draw together information to present a picture of health in each local area in a user-friendly format. They are a valuable tool for local government, health services and partners in helping them to understand community needs, so that they can work to improve people’s health and reduce health inequalities.

Ethnic inequalities in labour market participation?

ethnicity-blog-img-1Using recently published 2011 Census data the Centre on Dynamics of Ethnicity has analysed ethnic differences in labour market participation for men and women aged 25 to 49 in England and Wales.

Summary findings

  • The White ethnic groups(with the marked exception of the Gypsy or Irish Traveller group) were in a more advantaged position in the labour market compared with other ethnic groups.
  • This advantage is apparent from rates of economic activity and unemployment. For economic activity, only Indian men and Black Caribbean women had a similar rate to the White ethnic groups. For unemployment, Pakistani men had rates that were one and a half times the rate for White British men, and Black Caribbean men had rates almost three times as high. Pakistani women’s unemployment rate was more than three times White British women’s, and for Black Caribbean women, unemployment was more than twice White British women’s.

  • Women had lower rates of economic activity than men in all ethnic groups. However, this difference was greatest for Bangladeshi (87% for men vs. 40% for women), Pakistani (88% vs. 43%), Arab (69% vs. 40%) and White Gypsy or Irish Traveller (67% vs. 41%) groups.
  • The White Gypsy or Irish Traveller group was particularly disadvantaged. Both men and women had very low rates of economic activity (67% for men and 41% for women) and very high rates of unemployment (16% for men and 19% for women).
  • Men and women in each of the Black and Mixed Black ethnic groups, except for Black Caribbean women, had high rates of unemployment.
  • One third of Bangladeshi economically active men were in part-time work, a surprisingly high rate that was equivalent to that for Bangladeshi women.

To open the full briefing please click here.

The cumulative impact of welfare reforms

Inclusion-logoLess than one quarter of welfare recipients will be in a position to mitigate reductions in benefit payments by finding work or moving to cheaper accommodation, an independent study carried out by the Centre for Economic and Social Inclusion has today revealed.

The study shows that by 2015–16 the income of households claiming benefit will be lower on average by £1,615 per year (£31 per week). This is equivalent to around £1 in every £7 of household income. However, a shortage of jobs and affordable homes in many areas means that four out of every five of these households are likely to need some form of assistance from their council to help them cope with the reduction in welfare.

To open the full report please click here.