Households below a Minimum Income Standard: 2008/9 to 2011/12

JRF-logoCommissioned research show almost 1 million more households in the UK are living below the minimum income standard, taking the figure to 4.7 million households at 2011/12.

Key points

  • The most severe increase has been among single people of working age, where the percentage unable to afford this minimum acceptable standard of living rose from 29 per cent to 36 per cent.
  • Among single people aged under 35 it rose even faster, from 29 to 42 per cent. This group also had an even greater increase in risk of having extremely low incomes, of less than half the minimum required.
  • Two in three people in lone parent families are now below Minimum Income Standard.
  • Pensioners and couples without children remain the most likely to have an adequate income.

The full report can be opened here.

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Non-UK Born Population of England and Wales Quadrupled Between 1951 and 2011

obs-blog-ons-logoThe latest Census analysis looked at changing migration patterns over 60 years.

Migration is an important driver of population change, currently accounting for around half of the population growth in England and Wales; with natural change (births and deaths) accounts for the remaining population change. Historic census data has been used to show the growth in the non-UK born population between 1951 and 2011.

This infographic shows the top ten non-UK countries of birth in each census year since 1951.

In summary

  • Non-UK born population quadrupled between 1951 and 2011
  • Non-UK born population has become more diverse since 1951
  • Numbers of Irish-born residents in England and Wales decreased
  • Those born in India were the largest group in 2011 at 694,000
  • 10 fold increase in Polish migrants over ten years from 2001-2011

To open the analysis in full please click here.

Severe disabilities may be restricting workers’ access to top jobs and careers

obs-blog-disability-logoIn England and Wales, the ‘higher managerial and professional’ occupation category had the lowest proportion of workers with severe disabilities in 2011.

An examination of the rates of ‘Limited a Lot’ from the 2011 Census show a pattern of increasing prevalence with decreasing occupational advantage. This infographic produced by ONS illustrates how people with more severe disabilities are distributed across the socio-economic position of occupations, and their analysis provides an insight into what extent disabled individuals can access jobs in higher classified occupations following recent Equality legislation.

Key points

  • The rates of disability prevalence vary substantially by socio-economic class throughout England and Wales.
  • There is a marked North-South divide in disability prevalence rates; rates were generally higher in the North and Wales for all socio-economic classes.
  • Men and women in the least advantaged ‘routine’ occupations had the highest rates of disability in every English region and Wales (while the most advantaged ‘higher managerial and professional’ occupations had the lowest rates), although some cross over is observed at local authority level.
  • The regional inequality in disability prevalence is mostly larger for men, except for Wales where it is larger for women.
  • The London Borough of Islington had the largest inequality in disability prevalence between occupational classes for both men and women; a difference of 29.4 and 26.5 percentage points respectively.
  • The local authorities with the largest inequality in disability prevalence are generally found in large population centres such as Inner London or in former heavy industrial centres of South Wales.

Please click here to open the full report.

Monitoring poverty and social exclusion 2013

JRF-logoAnalysis of the latest data on poverty in the UK.

This annual report by the New Policy Institute gives a comprehensive picture of poverty in the UK, featuring analysis of low income, unemployment, low pay, homelessness and ill health.

A focus on the geographical distribution of disadvantage reveals that national averages mask huge variations between areas in unemployment, educational achievement, and life expectancy.

The research shows that:

  • more than half of the 13 million people living in poverty in the UK in 2011/12 were in a working family;
  • while the labour market has shown signs of revival in the last year, the number of people in low-paid jobs has risen and average incomes have fallen – around five million people are paid below the living wage;
  • there is substantial movement in and out of work – 4.8 million different people have claimed Jobseeker’s Allowance in the last two years;
  • the proportion of pensioners in poverty is at its lowest for almost 30 years, but the proportion of working-age adults without children in poverty is the highest on record.

For the full report please click here, with a summary also available.

A tutorial on creating thematic maps from 2011 Census data

2011Census-logoLearn how to select 2011 Census small area data and create printable thematic maps for Bradford.

One of the easiest ways to explore the 2011 Census results is mapping small areas, making use of free online tools.

Tutorial

Let’s say you want to visualise Ethnic Groups in Bradford by creating a map of where people reside. 2011 Census data is hosted by Nomis and can be accessed by clicking here.

With the 2011 Census data front page open, choose Key Statistics followed by the KS201EW Ethnic Group table. Table information is provided, with a link to a full description. You want to Explore the data, so click on the Wizard Query.

You now have a 5-step process to complete, starting with geography selection.

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STEP 1 The small area you will use is Lower layer Super Output Areas. Select ‘some’ from the drop-down box then find Bradford from the next drop-down and click ‘tick all’, then Next.

STEP 2 is selecting ethnic groups. Uncheck ‘All usual residents’ and check only broad ethnic groups, then click Next.

STEP 3 is percent selection, which can be skipped. Click Next.

nomis_tutorial-img-7STEP 4 is choosing the format. Check ‘Map’ and click Finish.

STEP 5 is the download. Click ‘View map’ which opens a new window.

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Here you can select which Ethnic Group to visualise and customise your map size or include a background (as above), with a printable version if needed.

Tackling in-work poverty by supporting dual-earning families

JRF-logoHow can working families be helped out of poverty?

Research published this month reviewed trends in employment among couple families with children and considered policies and the wider context in four areas likely to affect their employment rate: family leave, childcare, the labour market, and the tax and benefit system.

Key Findings

  • The risk of poverty is much higher for children in couple families where only one parent works;
  • sole earner families account for a significant minority of poor families with children.
  • Many fathers have to work long hours, making it harder for them to get involved in family life and more difficult for mothers to work.

To enable more low-income families to have both partners in work, authors recommend allowing second earners to keep more of their wages before means-tested benefits are withdrawn; more publically-funded affordable childcare; and phasing in more generous family leave, including longer paternity leave.

Please click here to open the full report, with a summary also available.

2011 Census OAC Preliminary Mapping

2011Census-logoWe have produced a thematic map of Bradford for the preliminary 2011 England and Wales Output Area Classification.

The Output Area Classification (OAC) distills key results from the Census for the whole of the UK to indicate the character of local areas. It profiles populations, structures other data, and helps target resources.

To open the preliminary results map please click here.

Map legend code names

1 – Rural Residents
2 – Cosmopolitans
3 – Ethnic Mix
4 – Blue Collar Neighbourhoods
5 – Multicultural Metropolitans
6 – Suburbanites
7 – Hard-Pressed Households
8 – Urbanites

Pen Portraits for these ‘supergroups’ are available here.